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Fullerton PD rings out October on high note, raising nearly $3,000 for breast cancer research

Fullerton PD rings out October on high note, raising nearly $3,000 for breast cancer research

Fullerton PD rings out October on high note, raising nearly $3,000 for breast cancer research

By Greg Hardesty-Behind the Badge 

At the Fullerton PD, pink is yielding lots of green.

For the second year in a row, the agency held a Breast Cancer Awareness campaign in October, raising a total of $2,717 that will be donated to St. Jude for cancer research, said Lt. Andrew Goodrich.

This year, the money came from the purchase of pink T-shirts with the inscription “Put Cancer in Cuffs” and pink police badges.

Last year’s inaugural campaign netted $1,771 from the sale of T-shirts --- money that also went to St. Jude.

“Many of our employees have been impacted by breast cancer in their personal lives,” said Goodrich, whose grandmother died of breast cancer 22 years ago. “Several have had mothers, sisters and friends afflicted with the disease.”

Last year, the Fullerton PD took the lead from the Fullerton Fire Department and came out with a T-shirt for agency employees to purchase to support the fight against breast cancer. Chief Dan Hughes authorized officers to wear the shirts under their uniforms during the month of October.

This year’s T-shirts had a new design, Goodrich said, and the idea for pink badges was inspired by a similar campaign at the Sarasota PD in Florida. Hughes again authorized officers to wear the pink badges on uniforms as well as the pink T-shirts this October.

“Our shirts this year were conceived of and designed by our own personnel,” said Goodrich, adding that Det. Joe Zuniga, Community Service Officer Kristy Wells and Records Specialist Aimee Cullen were “invaluable” in putting together this year’s Breast Cancer Awareness campaign.

“This is a great campaign, and every little bit helps in the continuing effort by doctors to pursue better treatment for victims of this insidious disease, and hopefully ultimately find a cure,” Goodrich said. 

“We’re already thinking about what to do for next year.”

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